lowest rate guarantee!
exhibitions Fay Lansner

Fay Lansner Exhibit

“Fay Lansner is a too often neglected artist because of her insistence, early and late, on the body, on principles of embodiment, with no sacrifice of abstract persistence.” –David Shapiro, Art in America, 1980

In spite of her impressive record of more than 60 exhibitions, today Fay Lansner’s name may be known to art historians who study mid-twentieth century American art, but it is also a name often omitted from the retrospective view of galleries and museums today. Perhaps this is because, stylistically, Fay did not adhere to the abstract expressionist precepts that dominated the 1950s and 60s. Though figurative imagery was eschewed by mid-century modernists, Fay pursued a personal aesthetic that grew out of her study of the female form.

As the teenage daughter of Russian Jewish emigrés to Philadelphia, Fay Gross began to realize that her home was unlike those of her friends. Their families did not hold lengthy discussions about Socialism and classical music, nor did they speak Russian and Yiddish. This recognition of feeling “different” contributed to Fay’s lifelong interest in the dualities of life and art and her fundamental understanding of the interior life so essential to an artist. Lansner lived and studied in Paris, and was in New York in the height of the Abstract Expressionist Movement. Armed with her exposure to European art history and Hofmann’s lessons, Fay quickly became affiliated with her American peers, including Willem DeKooning, Joan Mitchell, and Franz Kline. She was briefly a member of the Artists’ Club, but felt relegated by the founding male leaders. Soon she joined Hansa, one of the first cooperative galleries that had begun to proliferate in Greenwich Village and the lower midtown area. Fay’s first American exhibition was held at Hansa in 1954. Other Hansa members included Allan Kaprow, Jane Wilson, and Wolf Kahn.

Even a cursory review of the foremost art publications during Fay’s most productive years includes frequent mention and often extensive coverage of her work. Fay’s artistic legacy is one of a strong artist, a woman strong enough to remain true to her own principles throughout her long and prolific career. Daphne Anderson Deeds (faylansner.com)


A percentage of all works sold will be contributed to The Betsy’s international relief program. See the Concierge or Front Desk for assistance. For more information on The Betsy’s Philanthropy, Arts, Culture, and Education programs. Contact

Untitled, 1958

Untitled, 1958

Untitled, 1950

Untitled, 1950

Untitled, 1950

Untitled, 1950

Untitled, 1958

Untitled, 1958

Portrait of Pete, 1953

Portrait of Pete, 1953

Figure Landscape, 1963

Figure Landscape, 1963

Tripadvisor reviews
  • "Perfect romantic getaway in our favorite beach town! The rooms were very cute, very clean, and perfect for our beach needs."

    - Melliet
  • "The The Betsy Hotel is in a great location where you can park your car and walk to everything."

    - Stuart B - Hoover, Alabama
  • "Perfection is the only word that fits it—beautiful in every way."

    - William - Prescott, Arizona
  • "I can’t say enough nice things about the The Betsy Hotel. The service was excellent and very friendly."

    - Joe M
  • "Amazing restoration of a beautiful property within walking distance of the beach and Del South Beach for dinner."

    - Mike R - Juno Beach
    Previous Testimonial Next Testimonial